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Thread: Anglo Polymers Road Race

  1. #21

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    Personally I'd rather people didn't touch wheels in the first place. Can't be that hard a feat, I've managed it.
    Rich. Putting the lard into bollard

  2. #22

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    Quote Originally Posted by racyrich View Post
    Personally I'd rather people didn't touch wheels in the first place. Can't be that hard a feat, I've managed it.
    I think you're right Rich, but you still need to teach people how to ride without touching wheels - this was always the job of the club run and the chaingang, but these seem to be in decline so no one learns before they go racing

    But Hugo does have a vaild point, we need to teach people what to do if it happens, just in case. If the rider Hugo talks about earlier had been prepared (okay far better if he'd been paying attention but....) he may have reacted differently. He may not 'cos the other thing here is once you've shown someone they need to refresh that knowlege from time to time

    None of this guarantees how we react when it happens for real, but it gives us a chance.

  3. #23
    Stagiaire
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by racyrich View Post
    Personally I'd rather people didn't touch wheels in the first place. Can't be that hard a feat, I've managed it.
    ...by not riding!



    Quote Originally Posted by Ade T
    I think you're right Rich, but you still need to teach people how to ride without touching wheels - this was always the job of the club run and the chaingang, but these seem to be in decline so no one learns before they go racing
    Glade club runs, every Sunday in the winter. We'll teach you how to ride in a group. Then we'll teach you how to do it after 4 beers, a coffee and a mint!

  4. #24

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    Quote Originally Posted by lombywill View Post
    ...by not riding!
    I was thinking more of the 700 odd road races I must have done. But yes, I find my front room remarkably free of bike related crashes.
    Rich. Putting the lard into bollard

  5. #25

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    Quote Originally Posted by Hugo Robins View Post
    Steer into the contact with the wheel in front, persist.

    I was thinking that everyone should print Hugo's post and tape it to the stem - but then it's looking at the stem, or your gears, or your computer, or your heart rate monitor that leads to touching wheels in the first place. (<anecdote> I remember a rider who touched a wheel and came down in front of me telling me in the car on the way back to the HQ that his computer was reading 32mph at the time. Even though I was in agony from my own injuries I felt very much like adding to his. <\anecdote>)

    Quote Originally Posted by Hugo Robins View Post
    Or is this wrong?
    I think that steering into the wheel is correct but I'm not sure about the leaning bit.

    Quote Originally Posted by Hugo Robins View Post
    You exacerbate the imbalance and the distance between your centre of gravity and the support offered by the bike, and so you need to bring the bike back under you even more sharply and you end up turning even harder than you were before. And if you turn still into the wheel that stops you then you fall.

    I said this was familiar and it is, because this counter-steering (as it's known) is used deliberately to produce a tighter turn and we all will find we do it naturally as we learn to ride. Remember though that this experience is a false friend when we first touch wheels.

    It's easy to be confused over what 'steering' means in a cycling context. (Does steering to the left mean making your bike go to the left or turning the handlebars to the left?)

    Imagine you are drifting from right to left and touch wheels with a rider in front drifting from left to right. There are three possible scenarios:


    1. If you take no corrective action your front wheel will be turned to the right by his back wheel while your body weight continues to go to the left. Your centre of gravity will no longer be over the wheels and you will topple to the left over the back of his bike.
    2. If your 'corrective action' is to turn your front wheel to the right (to get it away from his back wheel) the same thing will happen - just faster. What you have done is leaned your bike as you would to turn sharp right ...but it can't go because that back wheel is in the way. Even if the wheel is no longer in the way, doing a sharp right turn in the middle of the bunch is a sure fire way of causing a pile up.
    3. The correct corrective action, as Hugo says, is to turn your front wheel to the left, into the his back wheel. This is the only way that you stand any chance of keeping your bike underneath you. As far as leaning goes you need to need to keep your centre of gravity over the wheels. That's basic physics.


    Tim.

    PS (or should that be PC?). It doesn't matter whether it's his wheel or hers.
    -----------------------------------
    www.PerfectCondition.Ltd.UK
    -----------Bike Fitting-----------
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  6. #26
    4th Cat
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    Quote Originally Posted by TimW View Post
    It's easy to be confused over what 'steering' means in a cycling context. (Does steering to the left mean making your bike go to the left or turning the handlebars to the left?)
    On two wheels you have to 'counter steer' ie to turn left you have to turn the bars right just a fraction to start leaning - motorcyclists will know what I'm talking about.

    If you're in doubt, next time you're out on the bike, hold just the stem in one hand and turn it to the right and see what happens.

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