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Tony Asplin
22-06-2006, 07:46 PM
I note from Brian Potts Announcements regarding 2007 Events that all assistant commissaire should have some official qualifications when assisting on events.

I would like ALL CLUBS that are members of the Eastern Road Race League to be aware of your RULE 14

Member Clubs are expected to provide into the Division Commissaires Pool subject to approval (that means becoming qualified)

I don't see many of the Clubs taking this in place this season of for the last 8 seasons.

If it was not for Brian Potts, Ray Smith, and Derek Lusher you would not be able to run any events. It's about time the racing teams and new ERRL members started to get some Racing Officials as well as riders, if not the whole thing will collapse on itself in a few years.

Tony Asplin (A non ERRL Commissaire that will and has Commissaired ERRL Events this season)

Ben
22-06-2006, 09:01 PM
What's the typical number of occasions that you'd be expected to help in a season?

Nick E
22-06-2006, 11:07 PM
On a similar thread several weeks ago i've already volunteeered.

I do not know whether i'll be able to help every week due to my own racing commitments but i'm sure a couple of weekends will be helpful at least.

If all clubs had one of these people the workload would be eased.

pottsie
22-06-2006, 11:46 PM
This course is for assistant commissaires. You would be expected to work on your own club race and go on a list and help out as and when you can with other events. The more people that qualify the less events they will be expected to do.

If we do not get qualified assistant commissaires then races will not go ahead, as there are only 4 commissaires working on road & circuit events in Essex and you cannot expect them to cover all the events.

Joan

Nick E
23-06-2006, 09:10 AM
As i organise the VCB Summer Road Race, i guess i'll be ok to be Assistant Commissaire for it too?

And as i said before, i'll be able to help on a couple of other races during the year. The more doing this the less pressure on the current Commissaires.

Maybe if there's enough of us we might see the current Commissaires starting to train in the winter months and giving us a run for our money in the bunch???????? :wink: It's just a thought :D :D :D

pottsie
23-06-2006, 02:29 PM
Nick,
As the organiser, you are responsible for the event and should be available at all times during the race for any unforeseen occurrences, or called upon by the commissaire to rectify a problem around the course. You would be unable to do this if you also were the assistant commissaire. You have worked hard to put the race together so have a break for a while until the race finishes, if all is going well.
Brian.

Nick E
23-06-2006, 05:36 PM
OK Brian,

It would've been good to kill two birds with one stone but i see your point.

Alan Lawrence
23-06-2006, 07:56 PM
I note from Brian Potts Announcements regarding 2007 Events that all assistant commissaire should have some official qualifications when assisting on events.

I would like ALL CLUBS that are members of the Eastern Road Race League to be aware of your RULE 14

Member Clubs are expected to provide into the Division Commissaires Pool subject to approval (that means becoming qualified)

I don't see many of the Clubs taking this in place this season of for the last 8 seasons.

If it was not for Brian Potts, Ray Smith, and Derek Lusher you would not be able to run any events. It's about time the racing teams and new ERRL members started to get some Racing Officials as well as riders, if not the whole thing will collapse on itself in a few years.

Tony Asplin (A non ERRL Commissaire that will and has Commissaired ERRL Events this season)

....well worded Tony and lets hope people take note. :?: :wink:

Delboy
24-06-2006, 11:20 AM
Re the recent comments about Commissaires (both the standard of commissairing, Beccles in particular, and the upcoming commissaires training course)
The standard of riding at some events this year has been appalling, causing me to stop one event after which the standard improved to an acceptable level. I believe in giving the riders one such warning when on the road as the impact of this is greater than anything said at the HQ. I can assure riders that one warning is all you will get from me before disq. or abandoning the event. The police have made comments about the Beccles RR and at the moment there is a doubt over next years event and it is worth remembering that VC Baracchi have an application with the same Constabulary for another event this year.
I would advise all competitors and Commissaires to ensure that events are run safely and with consideration to other road users.
The training course for Assistant Commissaires will be in Chelmsford on the 28th October. No event will be given a permit unless the A / Comm has completed this course.
I will send details to all promoting clubs shortly.
Derek, RCA.

Nick E
24-06-2006, 07:30 PM
I have seen some of the notes by Suffolk Police and they don't make good reading for us cyclists.

We've flogged the standard of riding at the Beccles on another thread to death so i won't restart all that again but here's my penny's worth.....

Perhaps to agree with their views and stipulate new rules next year state an Assistant Commissaire as well as a Commissaire will be in attendance of all ERRL races and disqualification and/or abandonment of the event would be definite option as opposed to a rare option as in the past?

Commissaires generally give us an ear-bashing about crossing the white line before an event anyway so extra warnings or tougher rules need to be in place. Specific signs at HQ before the race when signing in perhaps?

My concern is VCB Summer RR this year. It's still in Suffolk (mostly) and Norfolk Police in the past have been very strict about racing on their highways. As organisers we can do only so much, it seems the emphasis is on us to guarantee safety but the riders are the ones creating the danger.

It's like Britain's roads...... they're the safest in the world except one small problem...... the drivers!

Tony Asplin
24-06-2006, 10:43 PM
Regarding Derek Lusher's remarks the event in question was Essex based.

As a past organiser of the Jock Wadley Memorial RR for 18 years may I suggest that ALL races have 3 Lead Cars, 3 Commissaires, 2 Motorbike Marshals/Commissaires and at least 3 static marshals per major junction (B road or higher) as well as Police Specials where required.

There is no real difference on the road from a race like the Colchester Rovers promotion of the Jock Wadley to our old ERRL promotion the Abberton Reservoir RR. Races split up into many groups and need to be covered and protected. Try not to skimp on your race convoy.

Riders please make every effort to ride on your side of the road, remember it is not the Tour de France with a total road closure. Maybe some of you can remember the Tour of Britain a few years back over the North Yorkshire Moors when a Pro Rider was struck by a moving vehicle, they went on a go slow until they got better protection.

Just don't take stupid chances it is your sport don't loose it

Tony Asplin

pottsie
24-06-2006, 10:57 PM
As a past organiser of the Jock Wadley Memorial RR for 18 years may I suggest that ALL races have 3 Lead Cars, 3 Commissaires, 2 Motorbike Marshals/Commissaires and at least 3 static marshals per major junction (B road or higher) as well as Police Specials where required.

Tony, it would be great if clubs would provide the officials that you suggest, but with the lack of commissaires and all Motorbike Marshals/Commissaires having to be members of the National Escort Group, this would be difficult especially as the ERRL want and do run 2 races on some Sundays.
Joan

Colin Coe
24-08-2006, 01:51 PM
As a past organiser of the Jock Wadley Memorial RR for 18 years may I suggest that ALL races have 3 Lead Cars, 3 Commissaires, 2 Motorbike Marshals/Commissaires and at least 3 static marshals per major junction (B road or higher) as well as Police Specials where required.


Tony, it would be great if clubs would provide the officials that you suggest, but with the lack of commissaires and all Motorbike Marshals/Commissaires having to be members of the National Escort Group, this would be difficult especially as the ERRL want and do run 2 races on some Sundays.
Joan

Tony makes valid points. When you consider that it requires four officials to 'control' a football match within an enclosed venue, is that number excessive when staging a cycle race. I don't think so. Eastern Region/ERRL need to do what is best for the area and not be hidebound by rules (regulations).

You mention a handful of officials who turn out regularly for ERRL races yet I recall quite a number from when the BC published their names and addresses. Why aren't more of your 'resident' commissaires helping out? If some are only available once or twice a year, find out when they are free and use them on those dates.

You probably still won't have a sufficient number so insist that every club that wants to promote shall nominate a couple of assistants. Seminars are all very fine but experienced commissaires can instruct assistants on the hoof.

Much the same goes for motor-cycle commissiares. They don't need to be part of any group initially. Use them to control the riders, not other road users. Motor cyclists can also still be used as marshals. Gemini BC utilised a m/c club when they ran the Folkestone-London and Folkestone Charing races and proved exceedingly helpful. What about off-duty police motorcyclists.

The BCF are keen to follow the UCI technical regulations but in how many other European countries do the commissaires have to operate with other traffic on the roads? 8)

Nick E
27-10-2006, 07:09 AM
With the Assistant Commissaire's course in Chelmsford tomorrow, i'm sure all riders/clubs wish the attendees well :wink:

It's either that or we'll fine ya next year :!: :twisted: :!: :twisted: :!: :twisted:

Bianchiben
30-10-2006, 11:47 AM
Has any investigation into hosting on smaller circuits 4/5 miles, and having 'closed' roads - rolling closures?

The spectators would see more, and the hold ups for motorists would be shorted - limited to 2 miles / 5 minutes of going at 25mph if you're following the race- or more if you're approachign the race, as you'd hav stopped completely - and only have this for the main bunch..

The more i'm writing here, the more problems i'm envisaging, so i'll stop now... :lol:

Nick E
30-10-2006, 01:18 PM
Has any investigation into hosting on smaller circuits 4/5 miles, and having 'closed' roads - rolling closures?
They won't have any of that until the Cycle Racing on the Highways Act gets changed. That's a big one so i doubt it'll happen overnight :cry:

Colin Coe
01-11-2006, 01:36 AM
Has any investigation into hosting on smaller circuits 4/5 miles, and having 'closed' roads - rolling closures?
They won't have any of that until the Cycle Racing on the Highways Act gets changed. That's a big one so i doubt it'll happen overnight :cry:

The provision is there already but not being used. 8)

Nick E
01-11-2006, 07:16 AM
The current ruling gives the Police far too much scope to say "NO". :cry:
Risk assessments should provide the information for the police to make a balanced decsion, however, in my opinion, it's sometimes easier to find a reason to say no.
The 10 mile rule is old and belongs back in 1960 when the Cycle Racing On The Highways Act was first used.

Interesting fact:
Did you know the Tour De France is coming to Britain next year :?: :?:
Did you know legally they're only allowed 100 riders max under Cycle Racing on The Highways Act :?: :?:
If you have the time, read it, it's all in there, only 2 races a year can have 100 riders. Generally it's 80 max.
Double standards anyone :?: It might be because the Police force have spent millions getting the policing organised for the event.

racyrich
01-11-2006, 10:38 AM
An act of parliament was rushed through to enable the 1994 Tour to legally take place here. I expect the same will happen in time for next year's.

Colin Coe
01-11-2006, 01:13 PM
The current ruling gives the Police far too much scope to say "NO". :cry:
Risk assessments should provide the information for the police to make a balanced decsion, however, in my opinion, it's sometimes easier to find a reason to say no.
The 10 mile rule is old and belongs back in 1960 when the Cycle Racing On The Highways Act was first used.

Interesting fact:
Did you know the Tour De France is coming to Britain next year :?: :?:
Did you know legally they're only allowed 100 riders max under Cycle Racing on The Highways Act :?: :?:
If you have the time, read it, it's all in there, only 2 races a year can have 100 riders. Generally it's 80 max.
Double standards anyone :?: It might be because the Police force have spent millions getting the policing organised for the event.

The Chief Constables can give dispensation or impose any conditions if they so choose. I was given the OK for 200 riders by Kent, albeit having paid towards a full TOB size police escort whereas the 2004 Surrey League 5 day had somewhere in the region of 100 riders and no police assistance.

Kent police approved circuits of around three miles and we used one for the SEL Division Championships. Surrey Region also have at least one similar size road circuit.

Local authorities have the power to close roads and the police should be prepared to provide such assistance free of charge in certain cases. Have a word with Paul O'Kelly about his 'Circuit of Blackmore'.

Lack of imagination, time and persistance are often the only reason why cycle racing stagnates in this country.